danny woodburn

My Cincinnati ReelAbilities Film Festival Story

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Cincinnati ReelAbilities Film Festival posterWhen I was hired by the Cincinnati ReelAbilities Film Festival (organized by Living Arrangements for the Developmentally Disabled and presented by Macy’s)  late summer of 2014, much of Greater Cincinnati had never heard of it; and few people who I reached out to had any idea of the scope of the event or its value to our community – including me, admittedly. Even those who worked for the nonprofit host agencies did not realize the magnitude of what was to unfold.

People experiencing a disability or cognitive, genetic, physical and behavioral difference are often misunderstood. They are portrayed in photos and sometimes news stories as ‘less than’ normal or super human just by virtue of their own being. They are often not included, or at least not to the extent that they are people first with interests, hopes, dreams, talents, and even bad days, just like everybody else. Yet ‘they’ are about 20% of our population. And ‘they’ are the only minority population in which all people will be counted among them at some point in their lives.

The overarching goal of LADD and ReelAbilities in hiring me to serve as the director of public relations and communications was for me to support the unrelenting drive of determined volunteers and staff organizing the events  by being a catalyst for change – to bring the community together in support of not only an event but a cause so powerful as to have impact on each and every one of us in a direct or indirect way. I wanted to get people in this region talking to each other and realizing that inclusion and togetherness is not about ‘other people’, it is about themselves and each other. I wanted to get people excited about ReelAbilities as a world class film festival, and come out to support and learn from it. The challenge was to do all of this with a very limited budget including for my own time, but I was up for the challenge as the cause is something very important to me.

Actors Danny Woodburn, Daryl 'Chill' Mitchell, and Cincinnati Reds' Ted Kremer

Actors Danny Woodburn and Daryl ‘Chill’ Mitchell with Festival Honorary Chair Ted Kremer

For eight days beginning February 27, Greater Cincinnati was transformed into a film screening mecca with out-of-town celebrities helping Cincinnati explore our differences, and our shared humanity. Internationally acclaimed photographer Rick Guidotti; Michigan Supreme Court Justice Richard Bernstein; Project Runway fan favorite Justin LeBlanc; Cincinnati icons Ted Kremer, Drew Lachey, Nick and Nina Clooney, Dave Parker and Ken Anderson;  former snowboarding champion Kevin Pearce; and actors Danny Woodburn, Kurt Yaeger, Daryl ‘Chill’ Mitchell, John Lawson, David DeSanctis (from Where Hope Grows), Jesus Sanchez-Velez (from Stand Clear of the Closing Doors); veterans SSG Travis Mills and Michael Schlitz; and Steve Wampler, who climbed El Capitan, where just some of the big name personalities who came to Cincinnati to be part of ReelAbilities. Academy Award Winning Actress Marlee Matlin was our keynote speaker for our Kick Off Celebration Luncheon that hosted hundreds.

The films of ReelAbilities were selected from some 500 plus submitted for jurying, many of them with wide international acclaim and awards to their name. Their common thread was that they celebrated the lives and stories of people experiencing disability. Many were shown with the film actors/subjects as special guests; and all screenings included a thought provoking discussion at the end.

I saw and still do see ReelAbilities as an opportunity to open dialogue and doors about topics that, for the most part, have been barricaded from our conversations – or at least in productive ways out of discomfort or lack of interest or personal connection.

There were so many strategies that I put into place (with help from wonderful volunteers and staff) to reach out to our community and pull people in through their personal stories and connections – their differences, and their shared humanity. And, in the end, it all came together to create a community that supported the film festival beyond our wildest dreams in classrooms, board rooms, businesses, entertainment venues, stores, nonprofits, and universities. Nearly 4500 people attended our events, with numerous film screenings having sold out.

The honest questions that were asked, the open answers that were shared, and the comments afterward from film goers told all of us that others grew from it too with expanded and even new perspectives.

There were so many people whose words and actions touched me in meaningful ways that it has been difficult to find the right words to capture its impact on me.

Steve and Elizabeth Wampler at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center Seacrest Studios

Steve and Elizabeth Wampler at the Seacrest Studios

There was Kevin Pearce who took us into his life and shared his family tradition with all of us, ringing a Tibetan singing bowl to facilitate awareness of the moment – even at our formal Mingle with the Stars Gala. And, speaking of the Gala, anytime you have comedian actors in a room together and give them center stage to improvise, laughter is bound to follow. That was the genius idea (and somewhat brave too) of Festival Managing Director Susan Brownknight.

I remember the first time I met Richard Bernstein. He was so filled with genuine flattery of everyone he met. That, I came to learn quickly, is just his way. It is a gift and something I came to treasure about being around him.

We brought our VIPs to the Seacrest Studios at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center where kids could interact with them. It is there where I saw the infectious laughter of Danny Woodburn, Daryl ‘Chill’ Mitchell and John Lawson banter between each other; and again when Steve and Elizabeth Wampler sat side-by-side. Steve shared this message with hospital patients, “Don’t let anyone tell you, no, you can’t do that. Anything is possible.”

Justin LeBlanc of Project Runway visited Ohio Valley Voices

Justin LeBlanc at Ohio Valley Voices

Justin LeBlanc promoted literacy by reading a book about inclusion to an entire gymnasium filled with school children; promoted creativity by helping students who are deaf to design and show fashions; and promoted abilities by speaking about his own personal story. Young students at Ohio Valley Voices also got to ask Justin lots of questions – like ‘When is your birthday?’, ‘What is your favorite color?’ and ‘Do you have a dog?’

While here, SSG Travis Mills , one of five surviving quadruple amputee veterans from the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, met for the very first time a critical care doctor who provided medical care after his 2012 injury during his air care transport from Kandahar to Bagram. Together we took them to tour UC Health’s Center for Sustainment of Trauma and Readiness or C-STARS where Major Dr. Laurae Rettig was trained. I’ll always remember Travis’ wicked sense of humor…and his rotating hand that he can make go round and round and round.

I always welcome Rick Guidotti’s bear hug. The lens from which he sees the world has opened eye across the globe to see the gift of each individual and the beauty in difference.

I treasured all of the time I got to spend with my friends, Danny Woodburn, and his wife, Amy Buchwald. They are two incredible people who I look up to as examples of role models when it comes to integrity and perseverance. Equaled with their talent is their fearlessness when it comes to standing up for what they believe in.

Danny Woodburn and Amy Buchwald at Cincinnati ReelAbilities Film Festival

Amy Buchwald and Danny Woodburn

ReelAbilities gave me the opportunity to get to know and admire John Lawson, an encourager and leader, with a gift for bringing out the best in others.

Then there is the Festival Chair Kathleen Cail, Co-Chairs Sara Bitter and Kara Ayers; Managing Director Susan Brownknight; staff team – Jesse, Hannah, Molly, and Jen; and all of the committee volunteers for whom I have so much respect. They are such an awesome group of passionate, hard working, and dedicated people without whom this would not have been possible.

The Festival was about people coming together, standing up for and embracing eachother. It was about opening eyes and minds to see beyond people’s differences to what we all share – our humanity. I celebrate LADD for having the vision, foresight, courage and strength to create and organize such a community changing event. I am especially in awe of Susan Brownknight as our leader.

In her luncheon speech, Marlee Matlin looked out into the audience and shared, “We need to keep opening doors when people want them shut. We need to shine the light on ignorance when people want to keep us in the dark. And we need to make noise when they want to keep us quiet. But most of all, we need to keep on being ourselves, follow your heart and in the end accommodation will happen. We are the ones who can make it happen.”

Yes, Marlee, you are right we are. Let’s make our voices be heard!

 

#DifferentLikeYou

 

Marlee Matlin, Danny Woodburn And Others Celebrate ReelAbilities

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I have always been a fan of the popular NBC sitcom, Seinfeld. And some of my favorite episodes involved the volatile, quirky character of Mickey Abbott (Kramer’s friend) played by actor Danny Woodburn.

It was through my work with the Inclusion Network many years ago that I got to know a different side of Danny, a deep, passionate, caring and loving man who is not afraid to stand up for what he believes in. And, one thing he believes in is the equality, inclusion and dignity of those who have differences. Please click here to read an article about him and his role in Mirror, Mirror in the Wall Street Journal.

I hired Danny to speak at our Inclusion Leadership Awards Event, and I’ll never forget that more than 900 people attended to hear him speak while a blizzard was making roadways dangerously treacherous outside. Danny received a standing ovation that night and as he looked out into the crowd of cheering voices, he told us with a tear in his eye, “Even thought every script is a battle to see how much I’ll compromise, it’s worth it as long as there’s dialogue,” adding, “It’s inspiring to me as I look out at all your faces and see that there are comrades in this battlefield.”

It should be no surprise that I’ve stayed in touch with Danny. He is a friend and role model to me in so many ways. And how absolutely exciting it was for me to get an email from him this past summer telling me he is coming to town for the Cincinnati ReelAbilities Film Festival, for whom I am proudly now director of public relations. I can hardly wait to see him and his wife, Amy, and share his message once again with our great city.

Danny won’t be the only television and film celebrity joining us.

Oscar and Golden Globe Award Winning Actress Marlee Matlin heads a list of big screen stars coming to Cincinnati February 27 to help celebrate our region’s largest film festival, the Cincinnati ReelAbilities Film Festival organized by Living Arrangements for the Developmentally Disabled (LADD), and presented by Macy’s. We are expecting to attract thousands through world class film and speaking events and celebrates our community’s diversity and shared humanity.

Marlee Matlin coming to the Cincinnati ReelAbilities Film Festival

Marlee Matlin

Marlee, currently starring in ABC’s Switched at Birth, will be the key note speaker for the ReelAbilities Awards Premiere Luncheon.

Additional stars to participate in the Festival events are Justin LeBlanc, popular finalist on Project Runway Season 12, and current contestant in Project Runway All Stars Season 4; Daryl Chill Mitchell, who starred in the FOX sitcom Brothers with NY Giants football player Michael Strahan and currently can be seen on CBS’ NCIS New Orleans; and Kurt Yaeger, whose many film credits include Dolphin Tale and War Flowers, and whose most recent television role is as the fan favorite character on FX’s hit show Sons of Anarachy.

The Festival hashtags are #DifferentLikeYou and #CincyRA.

 

Celebrating Differences Is What ReelAbilities Is About

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I was reminded the other day of how great it has been knowing that my public relations career has been focused on bringing awareness and relationships to some truly impactful causes and organization.

And a client about which I was so passionate and miss the most was an organization called the Inclusion Network. For eight years I worked with them year round promoting the message that everyone has gifts and abilities, and that bringing those unique gifts together we strengthen each other. We strengthen our community.

I was one of the lead producers of the Inclusion Leadership Awards Event responsible for the strategic messaging including hiring and working with speakers to keep their speech on target, writing the script and the videos, working on all facets of the program portion, coordinating the media relations and more. And I saw that event grow to where it was hosting more than 900 people at the end.

Business and community leaders, professionals, housewives, students, volunteers, people who walk and people who use wheelchairs, people who benefit from large print programs and open captioned video screens, sign language interpreters or cups with handles instead of glassware all came together for a two and a half hour event that was designed to somehow change the world as they knew it. They heard about stories of organizations that instinctively know how to uncover talent, and of people, whose abilities are no longer obscurities. Acceptance was no longer an abstract. Inclusion, they learned, was not about THEM, but about ME.

Actor Danny Woodburn continues to stand out to me as the speaker whose message I will always remember. Danny shared his story of an actor, comedian and activist whose talents were born in the hardships of a world unaccepting of a medical condition known as dwarfism. All too well, he knows the sting of rejection and ridicule because he has lived it his entire life. But Danny told our vast audience that through his work, he has had the ability to influence attitudes. Offensive words, he has found, are generally rooted in Actor Danny Woodburn spoke at the Inclusion Leadership Awards Event in Cincinnatimisunderstanding and he openly corrects producers, directors and other actors.

At the end of Danny’s speech I remember he told us, “Even though every script is a battle to see how much I will comprise, it is worth it as long as there is dialogue.” Then he looked into the audience and added, “It is inspiring to me as I look out at all of your faces and see that there are comrades in this battlefield.”

To this day, Danny’s words and character continue to impact me. Sure, I love the fact that every time we talk he can always make me laugh but what I love even more is Danny’s true depth of humanity. He is truly one of those unique gifts and someone who I feel so blessed to be able to call a friend.

And the reason I am bringing this all up is because it is all leading up to a new client that is allowing me to continue this path of bringing communities together through the differences that make people uniquely great.

Organized by Cincinnati nonprofit LADD (Living Arrangements for the Developmentally Disabled), the Cincinnati ReelAbilities Film Festival is our region’s largest film festival that explores the world as experienced by people with disabilities. It will include a a star studded awards premiere luncheon, gala, and 30 film and speaking events throughout Greater Cincinnati. All of the film screenings benefit local nonprofit organizations that enhance the lives of people with disabilities.

The Festival will be February 27 to March 7, 2015 and next week I invite you to join us at our big red carpet unveiling party at the eloquent Obscura cocktail lounge in downtown Cincinnati from 7 to 9 pm. The films and venues will be announced before hundreds quote from Q102's Jenn Jordan about the Cincinnati ReelAbilities Film Festivalof guests by actor John Lawson and Q102’s Jenn Jordan.

Here is a link to register for the free event.

The ReelAbilities Film Festival was founded in 2007 in New York City by the Manhattan JCC and has grown to become the largest film festival in the country dedicated to sharing the stories, lives and art of people who experience disability. It is now headquartered in Cincinnati and is a division of LADD. It includes a total of 13 Festivals across the country. Cincinnati holds the second largest one.

Danny, who most recently plays the voice of Splinter in the new Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles movie, was recently interviewed in Soapbox Media about ReelAbilities.

“Actors with disabilities are 90 percent less likely to be seen, and many characters with disabilities aren’t actually played by actors with disabilities,” he said. “It’s important for work like this to be done, and if I have the chance to speak out and be heard because I’m recognizable from being in the public eye, then I feel it’s my responsibility to do so.”

“But this isn’t just about actors getting work,” Woodburn continues. “Two-thirds of people with disabilities are unemployed; we need to raise awareness of that fact. If we want that to change, we as a society have to create an environment for change.”

Behind The Scenes Of Santa Paws 2 From Trainer Doree Sitterly

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Have you seen Santa Paws 2: Santa Pups? Such a beautiful, light-hearted movie with a tender message of love and hope is one that Eddie in Santa Paws 2should be included among family traditions.  In the all new Disney holiday classic, four frisky Great Pyrenees puppies – Hope, Jingle, Charity, and Noble – who nearly destroy Santa’s Workshop with their mischievous frolicking, decide they want to prove their responsibility. They want to spread the Christmas spirit all by themselves, and so, they stow away on Mrs. Claus’ sleigh as she journeys to Pineville. It is in the city of joy where the Santa Pups begin granting wishes with the help of a magic crystal, only something goes horribly wrong when a little boy wishes for the Christmas spirit to go away. And it does…across the world. Only Mrs. Claus and the puppies can reverse the spell.

I spoke with Trainer Doree Sitterly about working on the movie. Please visit http://SoMuchPETential.com to read our interview. Danny Woodburn

 

 

Danny Woodburn Talks About Acting With Dogs In Santa Paws2

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Have you heard? From the Creators of Disney Buddies…Santa Paws2: The Santa Pups! is available on Disney Blu-ray Combo Pack & HD Digital.

Just seeing a movie totally devoted to puppy awesomeness is enough of a reason for me to want to watch it. Now I have another reason. I found out my friend, Danny Woodburn, is starring in it. How much fun is that!

I couldn’t help but want to know what it was like for Danny – who has worked alongside Jerry Seinfeld, Robin Williams, Julia Roberts and others – to have co-stars who, well, had a very different acting style.

These are Danny’s answers to my questions.

 As an actor, how do you prepare differently for scenes where you are acting with a dog vs another person?

There is little difference in preparation, but the style takes some getting used to.  It’s good to know the dogs’ lines well enough so that the fluidity of your dialogue seems natural.  Richard Kind plays the voice of my main pal-around pooch, Eddie the Elf Dog.  Richard and I never get to work together as he comes in much later to record his dialogue.  I work directly with Kirsten Hanson who has been the script supervisor since I came to the franchise.  Kirsten calls out all the dialogue for the dogs off set, with some help from Joanne Gerein, our assistant director, feeding the dogs dialogue for the actors to respond to.  She is wonderful and creative and I give her a lot of credit.

Do you find that dogs or people are better at remembering their lines (or behaviors)?

The main pooches that have played Eddie are Sunshine and Anastasia both incredibly smart Jack Russells.  Their trainers live with and consider these dogs a part of their family who they get to go to work with everyday.  An actor will often miss his/her camera mark whereas these ladies always seem perfect every-time.  And they are good kissers (the dogs that is)

What was your biggest challenge as an actor working alongside a dog (or dogs)?

Getting De-wormed.

Seriously, I am always cognizant of their safety especially on outdoor shoots.  The dogs are kept warm and given special heaters in their wardrobe.  The real challenge though, is not overlapping my lines with a trainer yelling “Over here! Here girl. Leave it! Go mark! AHT AHT AHT!  STAY  GOOOOOOOOOOOD! …That and trying not to smell like chicken and hot dogs by the end of the day.

 Do you get involved in any of the training with the dogs?

Yes.  I have to work closely with newcomers and get them used to me so that they are comfortable.  This amounts to a lot of play time pre-shooting with them which i love.

How many dog actors were there in the movie?

There are eight main puppies – four who are young and four who are old, with a few doubles.  Three Eddie’s (JRTs) and about a dozen or so extra and bit players.

What was the most fun you had working on the movie?

I loved being creative with Eddie and sharing an impromptu moment.   I would say an off the cuff line to Eddie (Anastasia) and he would (she would) look at me on his (her) own with some expression, or give me a sloppy kiss.

There is a scene where we break Mrs. Claus out of jail and I suggested that I stand on the back of Eddie (JRT) to see in through the bars.  It looks hysterical with Eddie looking like he is supporting my weight on his tiny body.  In reality I am in a harness being fully supported above him, or it was magic.

To see the official Santa Paws2: The Santa Pups website, please click here.

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